Montadito de pringá, Andalusian pulled meat sandwich

montadito pringa


Montadito de pringá or pulled meat sandwich is a very typical tapa in Andalusia. The various meats used in the ubiquitous meat-vegetable stew known as cocido andaluz are shredded, mixed into a sort of rustic pâté or rillettes and spread on bread. Sounds great, doesn’t it?.


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The dish known as cocido, a hearty meat, charcuterie and vegetable stew that used to be the staple food of the poor all around Spain, is still widely popular in the country and it is prepared in as many variants as regions, cocido andaluz, the stew used to prepare pringá, among them.

The word pringá derives from the verb pringar, meaning to smear. It refers to the way the pringá is used and prepared, smearing it on bread or using pieces of bread to eat it from the plate.

After stewing the various ingredients for hours, the meats and charcuterie become very tender and can easily be pulled or shredded. They are fished from the broth and, using the meat fat as a binder, the thick paste obtained is generously spread on any typical Andalusian bread.

Montadito de pringá, Andalusian shredded meat sandwich
Author: 
Recipe type: Tapas
Cuisine: Spanish
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
Montadito de lomo is a sandwich filled with pimentón-marinated pork fillets and cheese. Find step-by-step photos and tips below the recipe.
Ingredients
For the meat stock
  • 1 pound brisket
  • Half a chicken
  • A piece of pork lard
  • A piece of Serrano ham
  • 3 raw knuckle bones
  • 2 salted pork spine bones
  • 1 chorizo
  • 2 pieces of cured ham, bone-in
  • 2 leeks
  • 2 carrots
  • 1 celery
  • 2 potatoes
  • 3 quarts (3 liters) water
For the montaditos
  • A much bread as you want
Instructions
Making the stock
  1. Use 2 large pans for making the stock. On the first pan place the chorizo, the Serrano ham and the vegetables, peeled and whole.
  2. Place the rest of the meats in the second pan. Fill with water to cover the meat and bring to a boil.
  3. Stew for at least 1½ hours, till the brisket is tender. Let cool and fish the pieces of meat out of the pans.
  4. Shred or cut into pieces all the stewed meat and put everything into a bowl, mashing it further with a fork. The fat from the lard will aid in binding everything together, although the stewed potatoes can be added too. You just made the pringá. Add some stock if you find it too dry, the resulting pringá should be smearable, similar to rillettes.
  5. Refrigerate the resulting stock, skim the surface fat when cold and solid and use it for wonderful soups or meat stews. It freezes beautifully.
Making the montaditos
  1. Open some bread rolls and generously fill with the pringá. For a wonderful result you can toast the filled roll in a sandwich maker o toaster.

montadito pringa


montadito pringa


montadito pringa


Tips for the best montadito de pringá, Andalusian pulled meat sandwich

  • As you see, only the meats are used for the pringá. We add the mashed stewed potatoes if needed.
  • Outside of Spain some of the meat cuts used in this stew may not be easily found, like the cured ham bone-in sections or the salted pork spinal bones. Use the best you can find, as long as you put some chorizo, good bones and a juicy brisket the result will be great.
  • Use any type of bread for montaditos, although we favor rolls with a crispy crust. No hamburger buns for this.
  • If you add a couple of cups of dried chickpeas, soaked overnight in water, to the vegetables pan you will get a more than genuine cocido instead of just the stock.
  • If you happen to find yourself with a lot of pringá remember that it can be frozen and kept for a rainy day, as well as the stock.

montadito pringa


Montaditos de pringá or pulled meat sandwiches are the tapa to have after a morning walk on the Andalusian dehesas, where free-range Iberian pigs are raised. Best with some fino wine.

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